Coverart for item
The Resource Librarians as learning specialists : meeting the learning imperative for the 21st century, Allison Zmuda and Violet H. Harada ; foreword by Grant Wiggins

Librarians as learning specialists : meeting the learning imperative for the 21st century, Allison Zmuda and Violet H. Harada ; foreword by Grant Wiggins

Label
Librarians as learning specialists : meeting the learning imperative for the 21st century
Title
Librarians as learning specialists
Title remainder
meeting the learning imperative for the 21st century
Statement of responsibility
Allison Zmuda and Violet H. Harada ; foreword by Grant Wiggins
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Zmuda, Allison
Dewey number
023.7
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
Z675.S3
LC item number
Z58 2008
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Harada, Violet H
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • School libraries
  • School librarians
  • Instructional materials personnel
  • School librarian participation in curriculum planning
  • Effective teaching
  • Educational change
Target audience
adult
Label
Librarians as learning specialists : meeting the learning imperative for the 21st century, Allison Zmuda and Violet H. Harada ; foreword by Grant Wiggins
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Adopting a Mission-Centered Mindset
  • 52
  • Challenge of Troubleshooting Learner Problems Predictable because of the Nature of the Learning
  • 53
  • Challenge of Trying to Teach All Kids Without Being Responsive to Cultural Background and Prior Experiences
  • 54
  • Part 3
  • Persistent Challenges in Collaboration
  • 56
  • Fallacy #1
  • Effective Instructional Practice Is a Matter of Opinion
  • 2
  • 56
  • Fallacy #2
  • Only Inexperienced, Weak, or Lazy Teachers Use Other People's Instructional Designs-Competent Teachers Design It Themselves
  • 57
  • Part 4
  • Implications for the School Library Media Specialist
  • 58
  • Personalizing Learning
  • 61
  • Supporting Differentiation for Learners
  • Role of Learning Principles in Achieving the School's Mission
  • 61
  • Collaboration Is the Key
  • 64
  • Scenarios of Practice: Personalizing the Learning Experience
  • 65
  • Chapter 4
  • Providing Robust Assessment and Feedback
  • 73
  • Expectations of the Learning Specialist
  • 73
  • 2
  • Part 1
  • Summary of Significance of Assessment
  • 73
  • Principles of Assessment
  • 74
  • Types of Assessment in a Robust Assessment System
  • 75
  • Part 2
  • Predictable Challenges in Assessment
  • 80
  • Part 2
  • Playing into Mythology that What Comes Quickly or Easily Is a Sign of Intelligence and What Comes Slowly and More Painfully Isn't
  • 81
  • Measuring What Is Easy Instead of What Is Necessary
  • 82
  • Viewing Assessment Solely as an Evaluation of Student Performance
  • 83
  • Part 3
  • Predictable Challenges in Collaboration
  • 83
  • Fallacy #1
  • Predictable Problems in the Design of Schooling
  • Learning Specialists Do Not Have Curricular Goals or If There Are Curricular Goals They Are of Secondary Importance to Subject Area Curricula
  • 84
  • Fallacy #2
  • Learning Specialists Are Not in Charge of the Design of the Assessment, Just the Orchestration of It
  • 84
  • Effective Collaborative Partnerships Require the Development of Leadership Skills
  • 85
  • Part 4
  • Implications for the School Library Media Specialist
  • 86
  • 4
  • Answering the Challenge for Deeper Learning
  • 86
  • Pursuing Personal and Aesthetic Growth
  • 88
  • Inquiring and Gaining Knowledge
  • 89
  • Drawing Conclusions and Creating New Knowledge
  • 91
  • Sharing Knowledge and Working in Teams
  • 92
  • "Isolation of School from Life" Continues to Create Passive Learners and Significant Dropout Rates
  • Looking to the Future: Providing Resources to Support 21st-Century Learning
  • 103
  • Part 1
  • Role of the Library Media Specialist in Identifying, Acquiring, and Accessing Resources that Support Learning
  • 104
  • Resource Demands of a Constructivist Teaching and Learning Context
  • 105
  • Impact of a Changing Student Population
  • 105
  • Extending Beyond the School
  • 4
  • 106
  • Impact of Technology on Information
  • 106
  • Ethical Issues Dealing with Information Access
  • 107
  • Part 2
  • Navigating the Changing Information Landscape
  • 107
  • Developing Digital Collections
  • 108
  • Persistent Achievement Gaps Exist among Students in an Increasingly Diverse Student Population
  • Supporting Digital Natives
  • 109
  • Web 2.0: Moving from Resources to Tools for Learning
  • 110
  • Snapshots of Practice
  • 111
  • Challenge Posed
  • 7
  • Part 3
  • Persistent Challenges in Collaboration
  • 7
  • Isolation Remains the Enemy of School Improvement
  • 7
  • Assumption that "Craft Knowledge" Is Acquired through On-the-Job Experience
  • 9
  • Part 4
  • Implications for the Library Media Specialist
  • xviii
  • 10
  • Challenges Faced
  • 10
  • Framing a Learner-Centered Mission Statement
  • 11
  • Pairing Mission with Learner Performance Expectations: The AIME Example
  • 12
  • Developing a Mission Statement for the Library Media Center
  • 13
  • Collaborating with Staff and Administrator on the Mission (and Mission-Centered Mindset)
  • Chapter 1
  • 14
  • Learning Principles in the Library
  • 16
  • Chapter 2
  • Learning Specialist: Clarifying the Role of Library Media Specialists
  • 23
  • Part 1
  • Summary of Significance of a Learning Specialist
  • 23
  • Part 2
  • Closing the Learning Gap: Reframing Our Mission
  • Predictable Challenges in the Design of Learning Specialist Positions
  • 26
  • Importance of a Clear Job Description
  • 26
  • School-Level Factors that Impact Effectiveness
  • 27
  • Collective Accountability for Results
  • 29
  • Collegiality among Staff
  • 29
  • 1
  • Leadership Structures that Support Learning Specialists
  • 30
  • Part 3
  • Persistent Challenges in Collaboration between Learning Specialist and Teaching Staff
  • 32
  • Collaboration
  • 32
  • Content and Pedagogical Expertise
  • 33
  • Reflection and Adaptability
  • Part 1
  • 34
  • Part 4
  • Implications for the School Library Media Specialist
  • 35
  • Focus on Teaching and Learning
  • 35
  • Nurturing a Collaborative Culture
  • 37
  • Planning and Working Strategically
  • 39
  • Significance of Mission in Schooling
  • Teaming with Other Learning Specialists
  • 42
  • Chapter 3
  • Designing Instruction to Fit the Nature of the Learning and the Learner
  • 47
  • Expectations of the Learning Specialist
  • 47
  • Part 1
  • Summary of Significance of Effective Instructional Design
  • 48
  • 1
  • Core Belief that All Children Can and Will Learn Well
  • 48
  • Learning Specialists as Coaches of Learning
  • 49
  • Part 2
  • Predictable Challenges in Instructional Design and Practice
  • 50
  • Challenge of Engaging Students in Their Own Learning
  • 50
  • Challenge of Knowing What the Student Needs and Quickly Responding to that Need
Control code
ocn212375669
Dimensions
26 cm
Extent
xviii, 128 pages
Isbn
9781591586791
Lccn
2008006036
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Note
023.7 Z7 ; P ; HQ-PF ; C-PF; C0808BT2.
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) 212375669
  • (Sirsi) 212375669
  • (OCoLC)212375669
Label
Librarians as learning specialists : meeting the learning imperative for the 21st century, Allison Zmuda and Violet H. Harada ; foreword by Grant Wiggins
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Adopting a Mission-Centered Mindset
  • 52
  • Challenge of Troubleshooting Learner Problems Predictable because of the Nature of the Learning
  • 53
  • Challenge of Trying to Teach All Kids Without Being Responsive to Cultural Background and Prior Experiences
  • 54
  • Part 3
  • Persistent Challenges in Collaboration
  • 56
  • Fallacy #1
  • Effective Instructional Practice Is a Matter of Opinion
  • 2
  • 56
  • Fallacy #2
  • Only Inexperienced, Weak, or Lazy Teachers Use Other People's Instructional Designs-Competent Teachers Design It Themselves
  • 57
  • Part 4
  • Implications for the School Library Media Specialist
  • 58
  • Personalizing Learning
  • 61
  • Supporting Differentiation for Learners
  • Role of Learning Principles in Achieving the School's Mission
  • 61
  • Collaboration Is the Key
  • 64
  • Scenarios of Practice: Personalizing the Learning Experience
  • 65
  • Chapter 4
  • Providing Robust Assessment and Feedback
  • 73
  • Expectations of the Learning Specialist
  • 73
  • 2
  • Part 1
  • Summary of Significance of Assessment
  • 73
  • Principles of Assessment
  • 74
  • Types of Assessment in a Robust Assessment System
  • 75
  • Part 2
  • Predictable Challenges in Assessment
  • 80
  • Part 2
  • Playing into Mythology that What Comes Quickly or Easily Is a Sign of Intelligence and What Comes Slowly and More Painfully Isn't
  • 81
  • Measuring What Is Easy Instead of What Is Necessary
  • 82
  • Viewing Assessment Solely as an Evaluation of Student Performance
  • 83
  • Part 3
  • Predictable Challenges in Collaboration
  • 83
  • Fallacy #1
  • Predictable Problems in the Design of Schooling
  • Learning Specialists Do Not Have Curricular Goals or If There Are Curricular Goals They Are of Secondary Importance to Subject Area Curricula
  • 84
  • Fallacy #2
  • Learning Specialists Are Not in Charge of the Design of the Assessment, Just the Orchestration of It
  • 84
  • Effective Collaborative Partnerships Require the Development of Leadership Skills
  • 85
  • Part 4
  • Implications for the School Library Media Specialist
  • 86
  • 4
  • Answering the Challenge for Deeper Learning
  • 86
  • Pursuing Personal and Aesthetic Growth
  • 88
  • Inquiring and Gaining Knowledge
  • 89
  • Drawing Conclusions and Creating New Knowledge
  • 91
  • Sharing Knowledge and Working in Teams
  • 92
  • "Isolation of School from Life" Continues to Create Passive Learners and Significant Dropout Rates
  • Looking to the Future: Providing Resources to Support 21st-Century Learning
  • 103
  • Part 1
  • Role of the Library Media Specialist in Identifying, Acquiring, and Accessing Resources that Support Learning
  • 104
  • Resource Demands of a Constructivist Teaching and Learning Context
  • 105
  • Impact of a Changing Student Population
  • 105
  • Extending Beyond the School
  • 4
  • 106
  • Impact of Technology on Information
  • 106
  • Ethical Issues Dealing with Information Access
  • 107
  • Part 2
  • Navigating the Changing Information Landscape
  • 107
  • Developing Digital Collections
  • 108
  • Persistent Achievement Gaps Exist among Students in an Increasingly Diverse Student Population
  • Supporting Digital Natives
  • 109
  • Web 2.0: Moving from Resources to Tools for Learning
  • 110
  • Snapshots of Practice
  • 111
  • Challenge Posed
  • 7
  • Part 3
  • Persistent Challenges in Collaboration
  • 7
  • Isolation Remains the Enemy of School Improvement
  • 7
  • Assumption that "Craft Knowledge" Is Acquired through On-the-Job Experience
  • 9
  • Part 4
  • Implications for the Library Media Specialist
  • xviii
  • 10
  • Challenges Faced
  • 10
  • Framing a Learner-Centered Mission Statement
  • 11
  • Pairing Mission with Learner Performance Expectations: The AIME Example
  • 12
  • Developing a Mission Statement for the Library Media Center
  • 13
  • Collaborating with Staff and Administrator on the Mission (and Mission-Centered Mindset)
  • Chapter 1
  • 14
  • Learning Principles in the Library
  • 16
  • Chapter 2
  • Learning Specialist: Clarifying the Role of Library Media Specialists
  • 23
  • Part 1
  • Summary of Significance of a Learning Specialist
  • 23
  • Part 2
  • Closing the Learning Gap: Reframing Our Mission
  • Predictable Challenges in the Design of Learning Specialist Positions
  • 26
  • Importance of a Clear Job Description
  • 26
  • School-Level Factors that Impact Effectiveness
  • 27
  • Collective Accountability for Results
  • 29
  • Collegiality among Staff
  • 29
  • 1
  • Leadership Structures that Support Learning Specialists
  • 30
  • Part 3
  • Persistent Challenges in Collaboration between Learning Specialist and Teaching Staff
  • 32
  • Collaboration
  • 32
  • Content and Pedagogical Expertise
  • 33
  • Reflection and Adaptability
  • Part 1
  • 34
  • Part 4
  • Implications for the School Library Media Specialist
  • 35
  • Focus on Teaching and Learning
  • 35
  • Nurturing a Collaborative Culture
  • 37
  • Planning and Working Strategically
  • 39
  • Significance of Mission in Schooling
  • Teaming with Other Learning Specialists
  • 42
  • Chapter 3
  • Designing Instruction to Fit the Nature of the Learning and the Learner
  • 47
  • Expectations of the Learning Specialist
  • 47
  • Part 1
  • Summary of Significance of Effective Instructional Design
  • 48
  • 1
  • Core Belief that All Children Can and Will Learn Well
  • 48
  • Learning Specialists as Coaches of Learning
  • 49
  • Part 2
  • Predictable Challenges in Instructional Design and Practice
  • 50
  • Challenge of Engaging Students in Their Own Learning
  • 50
  • Challenge of Knowing What the Student Needs and Quickly Responding to that Need
Control code
ocn212375669
Dimensions
26 cm
Extent
xviii, 128 pages
Isbn
9781591586791
Lccn
2008006036
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Note
023.7 Z7 ; P ; HQ-PF ; C-PF; C0808BT2.
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) 212375669
  • (Sirsi) 212375669
  • (OCoLC)212375669

Library Locations

    • Administrative HeadquartersBorrow it
      15616 E 24 Highway, Independence, MO, 64055, US
      39.11165 -94.39162
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