Coverart for item
The Resource The making of a story : a Norton guide to creative writing, Alice LaPlante

The making of a story : a Norton guide to creative writing, Alice LaPlante

Label
The making of a story : a Norton guide to creative writing
Title
The making of a story
Title remainder
a Norton guide to creative writing
Statement of responsibility
Alice LaPlante
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1958-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
LaPlante, Alice
Dewey number
808/.042
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
PE1408
LC item number
.L31887 2007
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • bibliography
  • handbooks
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • English language
  • English language
  • Creative writing
  • Report writing
Target audience
adult
Label
The making of a story : a Norton guide to creative writing, Alice LaPlante
Link
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0712/2007008030.html
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 26
  • 124
  • Exercise 1
  • Harper's Index on a Personal Level
  • 127
  • Exercise 2
  • Render a Tree, Capture the Forest
  • 130
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 131
  • Writing That Is Surprising Yet Convincing
  • "The Things They Carried"
  • Tim O'Brien
  • 131
  • "Nebraska"
  • Ron Hansen
  • 147
  • Chapter 4
  • Shapely Story
  • 152
  • Part 1
  • 27
  • Defining the Short Story
  • 152
  • Some Basic Definitions
  • 152
  • Conflict-Crisis-Resolution Model
  • 155
  • Linear vs. Modular Stories
  • 157
  • To Epiphany or Not to Epiphany?
  • 159
  • Resisting Paraphrase
  • Is Change Necessary? (The Debate Continues)
  • 161
  • On Not Becoming Slaves to Theory
  • 162
  • Exercise 1
  • False Epiphanies I Have Had
  • 165
  • Exercise 2
  • Opportunities Not Taken
  • 166
  • 28
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 167
  • "What Makes a Short Story?"
  • Francine Prose
  • 167
  • "Helping"
  • Robert Stone
  • 178
  • Chapter 5
  • Creative Nonfiction: Capturing What Has Eluded Capture
  • Why You Need to Show and Tell
  • 204
  • Part 1
  • Importance of Narration
  • 204
  • Some Basic Definitions
  • 204
  • Why "Show, Don't Tell" Is Such Common Advice
  • 206
  • Show-and-Tell Balancing Act
  • 30
  • 210
  • Traditional Uses of Narration (Telling)
  • 213
  • Why Narration Is Such an Important Creative Tool
  • 214
  • How Showing and Telling Complement Each Other
  • 216
  • Good Intentions, Bad Advice
  • 216
  • Showing-Telling Continuum
  • On Sentiment and Sentimentality
  • 218
  • Showing and Telling in Creative Nonfiction
  • 223
  • Exercise 1
  • Tell Me a Story
  • 224
  • Exercise 2
  • What Everyone Knows / What I Know
  • 226
  • Part 3
  • 31
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 227
  • "Brownies"
  • ZZ Packer
  • 227
  • "Winner Take Nothing"
  • Bernard Cooper
  • 245
  • Chapter 6
  • Who's Telling This Story, Anyway?
  • Our First Job as Writers: To Notice
  • 258
  • Some Basic Definitions
  • 259
  • First Person
  • 259
  • Whose Story Is It?
  • 261
  • Second Person
  • 265
  • Third Person
  • Chapter 1
  • 35
  • 267
  • A Word about Attitude
  • 272
  • Distance and Point of View
  • 272
  • Shifts in Narrative Distance
  • 275
  • Choosing a Point of View for Your Creative Work
  • 276
  • Point of View and Creative Nonfiction
  • Avoiding the "Writerly" Voice
  • 278
  • Common Point of View Problems
  • 280
  • Exercise 1
  • Change Point of View and Dance
  • 282
  • Exercise 2
  • Using Point of View as a Way "In" to Difficult Material
  • 283
  • Part 3
  • 36
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 284
  • "The Lady with the Little Dog"
  • Anton Chekhov
  • 284
  • "Moonrise"
  • Penny Wolfson
  • 299
  • Chapter 7
  • How Reliable Is This Narrator?
  • Exercise 1
  • 318
  • Part 1
  • How Point of View Affects our Understanding of a Story
  • 318
  • How We Judge the Integrity of the Stories We Hear and Read
  • 318
  • First Person Point of View and Reliability
  • 319
  • Third Person Point of View and Reliability
  • 324
  • "I Don't Know Why I Remember..."
  • Exercise 1
  • He Said, She Said
  • 328
  • Exercise 2
  • See What I See, Hear What I Hear
  • 329
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 330
  • "The Swimmer"
  • 38
  • John Cheever
  • 330
  • Chapter 8
  • You Talking to Me?
  • 341
  • Part 1
  • Crafting Effective Dialogue
  • 341
  • What Dialogue Is Good For
  • 342
  • Exercise 2
  • What Dialogue Is Not
  • 343
  • A Word about Attribution
  • 344
  • Five Important Tips on Dialogue
  • 345
  • On Subtext
  • 350
  • A Word about Dialect
  • 351
  • I Am a Camera
  • Using Placeholders
  • 353
  • Dialogue in Creative Nonfiction Writing
  • 354
  • Exercise 1
  • Nonverbal Communication
  • 355
  • Exercise 2
  • Them's Fighting Words
  • 355
  • 39
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 356
  • "Hills Like White Elephants"
  • Ernest Hemingway
  • 356
  • "Inside the Bunker"
  • John Sack
  • 360
  • Chapter 9
  • Part 3
  • Plot Thickens
  • 375
  • Part 1
  • Figuring Out What Happens Next
  • 375
  • Story vs. Plot: Some Basic Definitions
  • 375
  • A Word about Causality
  • 377
  • Render How-Don't Try to Answer Why
  • What Is This Thing Called Creative Writing?
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 379
  • On Metafiction
  • 380
  • Character-Based Plotting
  • 380
  • On Conflict
  • 381
  • Analyzing Plot Points
  • 384
  • Avoiding Scenes a Faire: Recognizing Cliched Plot Twists
  • 40
  • 386
  • Exercise 1
  • What's Behind the Door of Room 101?
  • 388
  • Exercise 2
  • "By the Time You Read This..."
  • 389
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 390
  • "On Keeping a Notebook"
  • "Sonny's Blues"
  • James Baldwin
  • 390
  • Chapter 10
  • Recognizable People
  • 418
  • Part 1
  • Creating Surprising-Yet-Convincing Characters
  • 418
  • Flat vs. Round Characters
  • Joan Didion
  • 419
  • Eschewing the General in Favor of the Particular
  • 420
  • Consistency as the Hobgoblin of Characters
  • 422
  • Ways of Defining Character
  • 423
  • Character and Plot
  • 427
  • Wants and Needs
  • 40
  • 431
  • Characters in Relationships
  • 433
  • Character in Creative Nonfiction
  • 434
  • Exercise 1
  • Emptying Pockets
  • 435
  • Exercise 2
  • Sins of Commission, Sins of Omission
  • "Emergency"
  • 437
  • Exercise 3
  • Seven or Eight Things I Know about Him/Her
  • 438
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 441
  • "Surrounded by Sleep"
  • Akhil Sharma
  • 441
  • Denis Johnson
  • "No Name Woman"
  • Maxine Hong Kingston
  • 453
  • Chapter 11
  • Raising the Curtain
  • 465
  • Part 1
  • Beginning Your Story, Novel, or Nonfiction Piece
  • 465
  • Your Contract with the Reader
  • 47
  • 465
  • Characteristics of a Good Opening
  • 467
  • Unbalancing Acts
  • 468
  • Starting in the Middle
  • 469
  • Beginning with Action
  • 471
  • On the Nature of Suspense
  • Chapter 2
  • 473
  • Beginning Your Creative Nonfiction Piece
  • 474
  • Exercise 1
  • Give It Your Best Shot
  • 475
  • Exercise 2
  • Start in the Middle
  • 477
  • Exercise 3
  • Splendid Gift of Not Knowing
  • Make Them Squirm
  • 478
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 479
  • "People Like That Are the Only People Here: Canonical Babbling in Peed Onk"
  • Lorrie Moore
  • 479
  • Chapter 12
  • What's This Creative Work Really About?
  • 23
  • 57
  • 507
  • Part 1
  • Art of Transferring True Emotions Onto Sensory Events
  • 507
  • Many Different Answers to the Same Question
  • 508
  • Writing about What Matters
  • 508
  • Transference: Borrowing from Freud
  • 509
  • Part 1
  • We Are Made of Dust
  • 510
  • Road to Universality
  • 511
  • But It's the Truth! And Other Common Pleas for Clemency
  • 512
  • Creative Nonfiction: On Being True as Well as Factual
  • 513
  • Making Things Carry More Emotional Weight than They Logically Should
  • 513
  • Writing as Discovery
  • Transference and Creative Nonfiction
  • 516
  • Exercise 1
  • Getting an Image to Spill Its Secrets
  • 518
  • Exercise 2
  • What I Lost
  • 519
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 57
  • 521
  • "Ralph the Duck"
  • Frederick Busch
  • 521
  • "The Knife"
  • Richard Selzer
  • 533
  • Chapter 13
  • Learning to Fail Better
  • 542
  • What Do You Know?
  • Part 1
  • On Revision
  • 542
  • Advice for Writers from Writers
  • 543
  • Perfection Is Our Enemy
  • 544
  • Workshop Method
  • 544
  • Undue Influence: A Cautionary Tale
  • 58
  • 548
  • Developmental Stages of a Creative Work
  • 549
  • "Hot Spots" and Other Noteworthy Aspects of an Early Draft
  • 550
  • An Exercise-Based Approach to Deep Revision
  • 551
  • A Word about Constraints
  • 552
  • Analytical/Mechanical Exercises
  • Creative Nonfiction: Making the Ordinary Extraordinary
  • 553
  • Creative Exercises
  • 554
  • Research-Based Exercises
  • 555
  • Chance-Based Exercises
  • 556
  • Revision Example: "The Company of Men"
  • Jan Ellison
  • 556
  • 61
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 574
  • "Shitty First Drafts"
  • Anne Lamott
  • 574
  • "The Carver Chronicles"
  • D. T. Max
  • 578
  • "The Bath"
  • Writing Down What You Don't Know (About What You Know)
  • Raymond Carver
  • 591
  • "A Small, Good Thing"
  • Raymond Carver
  • 597
  • Chapter 14
  • Getting beyond Facts to Truth
  • 619
  • Part 1
  • Some Final Thoughts on Creative Nonfiction
  • 62
  • 619
  • Just the Facts, Ma'am
  • 620
  • Recollections and Re-creations
  • 621
  • Ethical Considerations
  • 624
  • Subjectivity vs. Objectivity
  • 626
  • A Trip of Self-Discovery
  • Reconciling the Method with the Madness
  • On Rendering, Not Solving, the Mysteries That Surround Us
  • 628
  • To Be In or Out of the Story?
  • 630
  • Part 2
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 633
  • "Learning to Drive"
  • Katha Pollitt
  • 633
  • List of Stories
  • 63
  • 657
  • Moving from "Triggering" to Real Subject
  • 65
  • Surprise Yourself, Interest Others
  • 67
  • Obsession as a Creative Virtue
  • 68
  • Exercise 1
  • Things I Was Taught / Things I Was Not Taught
  • 24
  • 69
  • Exercise 2
  • I Want to Know Why
  • 71
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 72
  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?"
  • Joyce Carol Oates
  • 72
  • Some Basic Definitions
  • "Welcome to Cancerland"
  • Barbara Ehrenreich
  • 87
  • Chapter 3
  • Details, Details
  • 107
  • Part 1
  • Concrete Details as the Basic Building Blocks of Good Creative Writing
  • 107
  • On Thinking Small
  • 25
  • 108
  • Defining "Image" within a Literary Context
  • 109
  • Imagery That Works on Two Levels
  • 111
  • On Seeing the General in the Particular
  • 113
  • On Crowding the Reader Out of His Own Space
  • 116
  • Don't Lose Any of Your Senses
  • Creative Nonfiction: A Working Definition
  • 117
  • Use of Concrete Details in Creative Nonfiction
  • 119
  • Use and Abuse of Metaphor
  • 120
  • When Should You Use Metaphor?
  • 123
  • Avoiding the "S" Word: Banishing Conscious Symbols from Your Writing
  • 124
  • Imagery as Creative Source
Control code
ocm85833282
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
677 pages
Isbn
9780393337082
Lccn
2007008030
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Note
808.042 L315 ; XX-N ; C0709BT3(SM) Rev. ; [SC29, 2@$21.95, DLG/CSS ].
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) 85833282
  • (Sirsi) 85833282
  • (OCoLC)85833282
Label
The making of a story : a Norton guide to creative writing, Alice LaPlante
Link
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0712/2007008030.html
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 26
  • 124
  • Exercise 1
  • Harper's Index on a Personal Level
  • 127
  • Exercise 2
  • Render a Tree, Capture the Forest
  • 130
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 131
  • Writing That Is Surprising Yet Convincing
  • "The Things They Carried"
  • Tim O'Brien
  • 131
  • "Nebraska"
  • Ron Hansen
  • 147
  • Chapter 4
  • Shapely Story
  • 152
  • Part 1
  • 27
  • Defining the Short Story
  • 152
  • Some Basic Definitions
  • 152
  • Conflict-Crisis-Resolution Model
  • 155
  • Linear vs. Modular Stories
  • 157
  • To Epiphany or Not to Epiphany?
  • 159
  • Resisting Paraphrase
  • Is Change Necessary? (The Debate Continues)
  • 161
  • On Not Becoming Slaves to Theory
  • 162
  • Exercise 1
  • False Epiphanies I Have Had
  • 165
  • Exercise 2
  • Opportunities Not Taken
  • 166
  • 28
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 167
  • "What Makes a Short Story?"
  • Francine Prose
  • 167
  • "Helping"
  • Robert Stone
  • 178
  • Chapter 5
  • Creative Nonfiction: Capturing What Has Eluded Capture
  • Why You Need to Show and Tell
  • 204
  • Part 1
  • Importance of Narration
  • 204
  • Some Basic Definitions
  • 204
  • Why "Show, Don't Tell" Is Such Common Advice
  • 206
  • Show-and-Tell Balancing Act
  • 30
  • 210
  • Traditional Uses of Narration (Telling)
  • 213
  • Why Narration Is Such an Important Creative Tool
  • 214
  • How Showing and Telling Complement Each Other
  • 216
  • Good Intentions, Bad Advice
  • 216
  • Showing-Telling Continuum
  • On Sentiment and Sentimentality
  • 218
  • Showing and Telling in Creative Nonfiction
  • 223
  • Exercise 1
  • Tell Me a Story
  • 224
  • Exercise 2
  • What Everyone Knows / What I Know
  • 226
  • Part 3
  • 31
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 227
  • "Brownies"
  • ZZ Packer
  • 227
  • "Winner Take Nothing"
  • Bernard Cooper
  • 245
  • Chapter 6
  • Who's Telling This Story, Anyway?
  • Our First Job as Writers: To Notice
  • 258
  • Some Basic Definitions
  • 259
  • First Person
  • 259
  • Whose Story Is It?
  • 261
  • Second Person
  • 265
  • Third Person
  • Chapter 1
  • 35
  • 267
  • A Word about Attitude
  • 272
  • Distance and Point of View
  • 272
  • Shifts in Narrative Distance
  • 275
  • Choosing a Point of View for Your Creative Work
  • 276
  • Point of View and Creative Nonfiction
  • Avoiding the "Writerly" Voice
  • 278
  • Common Point of View Problems
  • 280
  • Exercise 1
  • Change Point of View and Dance
  • 282
  • Exercise 2
  • Using Point of View as a Way "In" to Difficult Material
  • 283
  • Part 3
  • 36
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 284
  • "The Lady with the Little Dog"
  • Anton Chekhov
  • 284
  • "Moonrise"
  • Penny Wolfson
  • 299
  • Chapter 7
  • How Reliable Is This Narrator?
  • Exercise 1
  • 318
  • Part 1
  • How Point of View Affects our Understanding of a Story
  • 318
  • How We Judge the Integrity of the Stories We Hear and Read
  • 318
  • First Person Point of View and Reliability
  • 319
  • Third Person Point of View and Reliability
  • 324
  • "I Don't Know Why I Remember..."
  • Exercise 1
  • He Said, She Said
  • 328
  • Exercise 2
  • See What I See, Hear What I Hear
  • 329
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 330
  • "The Swimmer"
  • 38
  • John Cheever
  • 330
  • Chapter 8
  • You Talking to Me?
  • 341
  • Part 1
  • Crafting Effective Dialogue
  • 341
  • What Dialogue Is Good For
  • 342
  • Exercise 2
  • What Dialogue Is Not
  • 343
  • A Word about Attribution
  • 344
  • Five Important Tips on Dialogue
  • 345
  • On Subtext
  • 350
  • A Word about Dialect
  • 351
  • I Am a Camera
  • Using Placeholders
  • 353
  • Dialogue in Creative Nonfiction Writing
  • 354
  • Exercise 1
  • Nonverbal Communication
  • 355
  • Exercise 2
  • Them's Fighting Words
  • 355
  • 39
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 356
  • "Hills Like White Elephants"
  • Ernest Hemingway
  • 356
  • "Inside the Bunker"
  • John Sack
  • 360
  • Chapter 9
  • Part 3
  • Plot Thickens
  • 375
  • Part 1
  • Figuring Out What Happens Next
  • 375
  • Story vs. Plot: Some Basic Definitions
  • 375
  • A Word about Causality
  • 377
  • Render How-Don't Try to Answer Why
  • What Is This Thing Called Creative Writing?
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 379
  • On Metafiction
  • 380
  • Character-Based Plotting
  • 380
  • On Conflict
  • 381
  • Analyzing Plot Points
  • 384
  • Avoiding Scenes a Faire: Recognizing Cliched Plot Twists
  • 40
  • 386
  • Exercise 1
  • What's Behind the Door of Room 101?
  • 388
  • Exercise 2
  • "By the Time You Read This..."
  • 389
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 390
  • "On Keeping a Notebook"
  • "Sonny's Blues"
  • James Baldwin
  • 390
  • Chapter 10
  • Recognizable People
  • 418
  • Part 1
  • Creating Surprising-Yet-Convincing Characters
  • 418
  • Flat vs. Round Characters
  • Joan Didion
  • 419
  • Eschewing the General in Favor of the Particular
  • 420
  • Consistency as the Hobgoblin of Characters
  • 422
  • Ways of Defining Character
  • 423
  • Character and Plot
  • 427
  • Wants and Needs
  • 40
  • 431
  • Characters in Relationships
  • 433
  • Character in Creative Nonfiction
  • 434
  • Exercise 1
  • Emptying Pockets
  • 435
  • Exercise 2
  • Sins of Commission, Sins of Omission
  • "Emergency"
  • 437
  • Exercise 3
  • Seven or Eight Things I Know about Him/Her
  • 438
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 441
  • "Surrounded by Sleep"
  • Akhil Sharma
  • 441
  • Denis Johnson
  • "No Name Woman"
  • Maxine Hong Kingston
  • 453
  • Chapter 11
  • Raising the Curtain
  • 465
  • Part 1
  • Beginning Your Story, Novel, or Nonfiction Piece
  • 465
  • Your Contract with the Reader
  • 47
  • 465
  • Characteristics of a Good Opening
  • 467
  • Unbalancing Acts
  • 468
  • Starting in the Middle
  • 469
  • Beginning with Action
  • 471
  • On the Nature of Suspense
  • Chapter 2
  • 473
  • Beginning Your Creative Nonfiction Piece
  • 474
  • Exercise 1
  • Give It Your Best Shot
  • 475
  • Exercise 2
  • Start in the Middle
  • 477
  • Exercise 3
  • Splendid Gift of Not Knowing
  • Make Them Squirm
  • 478
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 479
  • "People Like That Are the Only People Here: Canonical Babbling in Peed Onk"
  • Lorrie Moore
  • 479
  • Chapter 12
  • What's This Creative Work Really About?
  • 23
  • 57
  • 507
  • Part 1
  • Art of Transferring True Emotions Onto Sensory Events
  • 507
  • Many Different Answers to the Same Question
  • 508
  • Writing about What Matters
  • 508
  • Transference: Borrowing from Freud
  • 509
  • Part 1
  • We Are Made of Dust
  • 510
  • Road to Universality
  • 511
  • But It's the Truth! And Other Common Pleas for Clemency
  • 512
  • Creative Nonfiction: On Being True as Well as Factual
  • 513
  • Making Things Carry More Emotional Weight than They Logically Should
  • 513
  • Writing as Discovery
  • Transference and Creative Nonfiction
  • 516
  • Exercise 1
  • Getting an Image to Spill Its Secrets
  • 518
  • Exercise 2
  • What I Lost
  • 519
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 57
  • 521
  • "Ralph the Duck"
  • Frederick Busch
  • 521
  • "The Knife"
  • Richard Selzer
  • 533
  • Chapter 13
  • Learning to Fail Better
  • 542
  • What Do You Know?
  • Part 1
  • On Revision
  • 542
  • Advice for Writers from Writers
  • 543
  • Perfection Is Our Enemy
  • 544
  • Workshop Method
  • 544
  • Undue Influence: A Cautionary Tale
  • 58
  • 548
  • Developmental Stages of a Creative Work
  • 549
  • "Hot Spots" and Other Noteworthy Aspects of an Early Draft
  • 550
  • An Exercise-Based Approach to Deep Revision
  • 551
  • A Word about Constraints
  • 552
  • Analytical/Mechanical Exercises
  • Creative Nonfiction: Making the Ordinary Extraordinary
  • 553
  • Creative Exercises
  • 554
  • Research-Based Exercises
  • 555
  • Chance-Based Exercises
  • 556
  • Revision Example: "The Company of Men"
  • Jan Ellison
  • 556
  • 61
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 574
  • "Shitty First Drafts"
  • Anne Lamott
  • 574
  • "The Carver Chronicles"
  • D. T. Max
  • 578
  • "The Bath"
  • Writing Down What You Don't Know (About What You Know)
  • Raymond Carver
  • 591
  • "A Small, Good Thing"
  • Raymond Carver
  • 597
  • Chapter 14
  • Getting beyond Facts to Truth
  • 619
  • Part 1
  • Some Final Thoughts on Creative Nonfiction
  • 62
  • 619
  • Just the Facts, Ma'am
  • 620
  • Recollections and Re-creations
  • 621
  • Ethical Considerations
  • 624
  • Subjectivity vs. Objectivity
  • 626
  • A Trip of Self-Discovery
  • Reconciling the Method with the Madness
  • On Rendering, Not Solving, the Mysteries That Surround Us
  • 628
  • To Be In or Out of the Story?
  • 630
  • Part 2
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 633
  • "Learning to Drive"
  • Katha Pollitt
  • 633
  • List of Stories
  • 63
  • 657
  • Moving from "Triggering" to Real Subject
  • 65
  • Surprise Yourself, Interest Others
  • 67
  • Obsession as a Creative Virtue
  • 68
  • Exercise 1
  • Things I Was Taught / Things I Was Not Taught
  • 24
  • 69
  • Exercise 2
  • I Want to Know Why
  • 71
  • Part 3
  • Reading as a Writer
  • 72
  • "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?"
  • Joyce Carol Oates
  • 72
  • Some Basic Definitions
  • "Welcome to Cancerland"
  • Barbara Ehrenreich
  • 87
  • Chapter 3
  • Details, Details
  • 107
  • Part 1
  • Concrete Details as the Basic Building Blocks of Good Creative Writing
  • 107
  • On Thinking Small
  • 25
  • 108
  • Defining "Image" within a Literary Context
  • 109
  • Imagery That Works on Two Levels
  • 111
  • On Seeing the General in the Particular
  • 113
  • On Crowding the Reader Out of His Own Space
  • 116
  • Don't Lose Any of Your Senses
  • Creative Nonfiction: A Working Definition
  • 117
  • Use of Concrete Details in Creative Nonfiction
  • 119
  • Use and Abuse of Metaphor
  • 120
  • When Should You Use Metaphor?
  • 123
  • Avoiding the "S" Word: Banishing Conscious Symbols from Your Writing
  • 124
  • Imagery as Creative Source
Control code
ocm85833282
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
677 pages
Isbn
9780393337082
Lccn
2007008030
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Note
808.042 L315 ; XX-N ; C0709BT3(SM) Rev. ; [SC29, 2@$21.95, DLG/CSS ].
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
  • (Sirsi) 85833282
  • (Sirsi) 85833282
  • (OCoLC)85833282

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