The Resource Usability matters : mobile-first UX for developers and other accidental designers, Matt Lacey, (electronic resource) | (electronic resource)

Usability matters : mobile-first UX for developers and other accidental designers, Matt Lacey, (electronic resource) | (electronic resource)

Label
Usability matters : mobile-first UX for developers and other accidental designers
Title
Usability matters
Title remainder
mobile-first UX for developers and other accidental designers
Statement of responsibility
Matt Lacey
Title variation
Mobile-first user experience for developers and other accidental designers
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
UMI
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Lacey, Matt
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QA76.76.A65
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Application software
  • Mobile apps
  • Mobile apps
  • Application software
  • User-centered system design
Label
Usability matters : mobile-first UX for developers and other accidental designers, Matt Lacey, (electronic resource) | (electronic resource)
Link
https://mcpl.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://proquestcombo.safaribooksonline.com/?uiCode=midcontpl&xmlId=9781617293931
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • p. 3
  • App usage at a micro-geographic level
  • p. 60
  • 3.2
  • Regional impact on an app
  • p. 61
  • Considering support, for multiple languages
  • p. 61
  • How culture and locale can impact an app
  • p. 65
  • 3.3
  • Great usability experiences are intuitive
  • When is the app used?
  • p. 70
  • Consider the time of day
  • p. 70
  • Consider the day of the week
  • p. 72
  • Consider the time of year
  • p. 73
  • How long is the app used?
  • p. 74
  • p. 5
  • 3.4
  • What activities are being undertaken while using the app?
  • p. 78
  • Is the person using the app moving or stationary?
  • p. 78
  • Is the user dedicated or distracted?
  • p. 79
  • Is use isolated or in conjunction with something else?
  • p. 80
  • Are they-standing, sitting, or lying down?
  • 1.2
  • p. 81
  • 4
  • What device is the app running on?
  • p. 83
  • 4.1
  • Write once, run everywhere?
  • p. 84
  • 4.2
  • Supporting multiple operating systems
  • p. 86
  • Six components of great app experiences
  • OS-imposed restrictions
  • p. 86
  • Looking like you belong on the OS
  • p. 87
  • Belonging on a version of the OS
  • p. 89
  • Belonging in the enterprise
  • p. 89
  • 4.3
  • Maintaining brand identity and differentiation
  • p. 6
  • p. 90
  • Branding vs. visual identity
  • p. 91
  • Separating your brand from the OS
  • p. 91
  • Maintaining OS conventions while still reflecting a brand
  • p. 93
  • 4.4
  • Supporting different device capabilities
  • p. 93
  • Context of use underpins everything in an app
  • Handling multiple physical device sizes
  • p. 94
  • Variations in internal hardware capability
  • p. 97
  • Accounting for software variations
  • p. 100
  • Part 2
  • Input
  • p. 103
  • 5
  • p. 6
  • How people interact with the app
  • p. 105
  • 5.1
  • Supporting different pointing devices
  • p. 106
  • Providing input with a finger
  • p. 107
  • Providing input with a stylus
  • p. 112
  • Providing input with a mouse and the keyboard
  • Input includes all ways data and information get into the app
  • p. 114
  • 5.2
  • Using a pointing device to provide input
  • p. 116
  • Supporting gesture-based input
  • p. 116
  • Supporting multi-touch input
  • p. 119
  • 5.3
  • When pointing and touch input become difficult
  • p. 7
  • p. 121
  • Touch events don't always do what the user wants
  • p. 121
  • Raw input events need special attention
  • p. 123
  • 6
  • User-entered data
  • p. 126
  • 6.1
  • Goals of the people using the app
  • 1.1
  • Output includes and goes beyond what is shown onscreen
  • p. 127
  • Improve tasks by minimizing input
  • p. 128
  • Improve tasks with defaults and suggestions
  • p. 134
  • Improve tasks with alternative inputs
  • p. 136
  • 6.2
  • How to ask for data to be entered in forms
  • p. 138
  • p. 8
  • Optimizing how the form is arranged
  • p. 138
  • Simplify how text is entered
  • p. 143
  • Password entry requires special consideration
  • p. 146
  • Simplifying entry from a fixed set of options
  • p. 149
  • Validation and required fields
  • p. 151
  • Responsiveness: how output is perceived
  • 7
  • Data not from a user
  • p. 155
  • 7.1
  • Data from web-based resources
  • p. 156
  • Dealing with the data you directly request
  • p. 156
  • Dealing with data pushed to the app
  • p. 158
  • p. 8
  • 7.2
  • Getting data from the device
  • p. 161
  • Input from the operating system
  • p. 162
  • Data from, the filesystem
  • p. 163
  • Data from, other apps
  • p. 164
  • 7.3
  • Connectivity changes and isn't always guaranteed
  • Getting data from sensors
  • p. 166
  • Transparency and permission when using sensor data
  • p. 166
  • Allow for variations in sensor input
  • p. 168
  • 7.4
  • Using heuristics and inferring input
  • p. 171
  • Enhancing the app experience based on an individual's usage
  • p. 9
  • p. 171
  • Enhancing the app experience based on the usage of all people
  • p. 172
  • Part 3
  • Output
  • p. 175
  • 8
  • Displaying items in the app
  • p. 177
  • 8.1
  • Resources are finite and must be managed
  • Fundamentals of good visual output
  • p. 178
  • Focus on the person using the app and their goals
  • p. 178
  • Meet the expectations of the people using the app
  • p. 178
  • Account for the specific device being used
  • p. 179
  • Respect standards and conventions
  • p. 180
  • p. 10
  • 8.2
  • Laying out controls on a screen
  • p. 181
  • Implying meaning and relationships through alignment and hierarchy
  • p. 182
  • Implying meaning and relationships through consistency
  • p. 183
  • Implying meaning and relationships through proximity
  • p. 184
  • 8.3
  • 1.3
  • Navigating within the app
  • p. 186
  • Common navigation patterns
  • p. 186
  • Special navigation considerations
  • p. 188
  • 8.4
  • Avoiding discrimination with what you display
  • p. 191
  • Ensure your UI works for everybody
  • How considering all six components can make apps better
  • p. 191
  • Saying Ike same thing to everybody who uses the app
  • p. 192
  • 8.5
  • Many factors affect the display of images
  • p. 193
  • One size doesn't fit all
  • p. 193
  • Physical size isn't everything: consider formats and formatting too
  • p. 196
  • What's usability, and why does it matter?
  • p. 10
  • Customizing image placeholders
  • p. 198
  • 8.6
  • Use distinct icons with specific meanings
  • p. 200
  • 8.7
  • Allow for extremes of connectivity and content
  • p. 202
  • Content that loads slowly or doesn't load at all
  • p. 202
  • Example 1
  • When content isn't available
  • p. 203
  • Avoiding empty states
  • p. 203
  • 9
  • Non-visible output
  • p. 207
  • 9.1
  • Physical and audio output support changes onscreen
  • p. 208
  • An email client
  • Give your app a voice
  • p. 208
  • Haptic feedback starts with vibration
  • p. 210
  • 9.2
  • Output to other apps and devices
  • p. 212
  • 9.3
  • Communicating from your backend
  • p. 214
  • p. 11
  • Allowing for multichannel communication
  • p. 215
  • Sending effective push notifications
  • p. 216
  • Using badges with push notifications
  • p. 219
  • 9.4
  • Communication via channels beyond the app
  • p. 221
  • Using email to communicate with your users
  • Example 2
  • p. 221
  • Using SMS to communicate with your users
  • p. 223
  • Using third-party messaging services to communicate with your users
  • p. 223
  • Part 4
  • Responsiveness
  • p. 227
  • 10
  • Understanding the perception of time
  • A nexus app
  • p. 229
  • 10.1
  • How people perceive mobile time
  • p. 230
  • Context influences the perception of responsiveness
  • p. 230
  • Perception is about feelings, opinions, and comparisons
  • p. 231
  • Being responsive with notifications
  • p. 233
  • p. 13
  • Meet expectations, don't just be as fast as possible
  • p. 234
  • 10.2
  • Influencing the perception of responsiveness
  • p. 236
  • Answer questions about what the app is doing
  • p. 236
  • Show appropriate progress when something's happening
  • p. 240
  • Animation can hide delays
  • Example 3
  • p. 240
  • Usable isn't the same as finished
  • p. 241
  • 10.3
  • Perceptions associated with the age of your app
  • p. 243
  • 11
  • Making your app start fast
  • p. 248
  • 11.1
  • A tower defense game
  • Doing the minimum to start the app
  • p. 249
  • Deciding what to do on startup
  • p. 249
  • Displaying a splash screen when launching the app
  • p. 252
  • 11.2
  • Preloading content to make the app faster
  • p. 254
  • Preloading content to distribute with the app
  • p. 15
  • p. 254
  • Preloading content for the app's next use
  • p. 255
  • 11.3
  • Preformatting content retrieved by the app
  • p. 257
  • 11.4
  • Caching content to save time and money
  • p. 259
  • Using in-memory and disk-based caches
  • p. 1
  • 1.4
  • p. 260
  • Checking for new versions of cached items
  • p. 262
  • When to invalidate and delete cached items
  • p. 264
  • 12
  • Making your app run fast
  • p. 268
  • 12.1
  • Using eager loading so people don't have to wait
  • Why you need to consider the six components in your apps
  • p. 269
  • Eager loading complements preloading content
  • p. 270
  • Beware of being too eager
  • p. 272
  • Knowing what to load eagerly
  • p. 272
  • 12.2
  • Parallel operations take less time
  • p. 273
  • p. 17
  • Synchronous and asynchronous operations
  • p. 275
  • Advice when working in parallel
  • p. 276
  • 12.3
  • Combining requests for improved speed and control
  • p. 279
  • Controlling the server your app connects to
  • p. 279
  • Getting faster responses by combining requests
  • Experience is an important differentiator
  • p. 280
  • Simplifying the client by combining requests
  • p. 281
  • Combining requests and local files
  • p. 282
  • Part 5
  • Connectivity
  • p. 285
  • 13
  • Coping with varying network conditions
  • p. 17
  • p. 287
  • 13.1
  • Not all connections are the same
  • p. 288
  • Securing your connection
  • p. 288
  • Connection-speed can vary
  • p. 289
  • Connection cost can vary
  • p. 290
  • Meet the expectations of those who'll use your app
  • 13.2
  • Occasionally connected is the norm
  • p. 292
  • Connections may not be possible
  • p. 292
  • Connections may be lost
  • p. 294
  • Connections may change
  • p. 294
  • 13.3
  • p. 20
  • Optimizing for subprime conditions
  • p. 296
  • Caching improves the experience in subprime conditions
  • p. 296 --
  • Planning for success
  • p. 21
  • 2
  • Usability matters to everyone
  • Who's using the app?
  • p. 27
  • 2.1
  • You aren't your users
  • p. 28
  • How you're different from your users
  • p. 28
  • You're not an average user
  • p. 31
  • Be aware of the effects on your thinking
  • p. 2
  • p. 32
  • 2.2
  • Who's the app for?
  • p. 33
  • Who'll get value from your app?
  • p. 34
  • Understanding the potential user base
  • p. 35
  • Are there enough people who want the app?
  • p. 36
  • Usability, UX, and design
  • Targeting groups of individuals
  • p. 39
  • Putting on a persona, or several
  • p. 40
  • Enterprise app usage
  • p. 42
  • 2.3
  • People aren't all the same
  • p. 43
  • Consider people's differing abilities
  • p. 2
  • p. 44
  • Consider people's differing expectations
  • p. 45
  • Consider people's differing goals
  • p. 47
  • 2.4
  • What are people doing?
  • p. 49
  • What are people doing with the app?
  • p. 49
  • Formula for app success
  • What else are people doing?
  • p. 53
  • 3
  • Where and when is the app used?
  • p. 57
  • 3.1
  • Where is the app used?
  • p. 57
  • App usage at a macro-geographic level
  • p. 58
  • 13.4
  • Balancing usability and a poor connection
  • p. 299
  • Prioritizing important activities in poor conditions
  • p. 300
  • Adjusting network usage based on network conditions
  • p. 301
  • 13.5
  • Keeping the user in control when conditions are poor
  • p. 302
  • Compression improves the experience in subprime conditions
  • 14
  • Managing power and resources
  • p. 309
  • 14.1
  • When it's gone, it's gone
  • p. 310
  • 14.2
  • Do you really need it?
  • p. 313
  • Lazy loading reduces wasted effort
  • p. 296
  • p. 314
  • Using alternatives to save resources
  • p. 315
  • 14.3
  • How often are you going to use it?
  • p. 318
  • Managing resources that are only used once
  • p. 318
  • Managing resources that are used repeatedly
  • p. 319
  • Deferring actions increases what's possible in subprime conditions
  • 14.4
  • Do you still need it?
  • p. 320
  • Turning off resources when finished
  • p. 321
  • Responding to changing circumstances
  • p. 322
  • p. 297
  • Batch operations in subprime conditions
  • p. 297
  • Automatic retries improve the experience in subprime conditions
  • p. 298
Control code
1056626391
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (1 volume)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781617293931
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
Stock number
CL0500000997
System control number
  • (Sirsi) 1056626391
  • (OCoLC)1056626391
Label
Usability matters : mobile-first UX for developers and other accidental designers, Matt Lacey, (electronic resource) | (electronic resource)
Link
https://mcpl.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://proquestcombo.safaribooksonline.com/?uiCode=midcontpl&xmlId=9781617293931
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • p. 3
  • App usage at a micro-geographic level
  • p. 60
  • 3.2
  • Regional impact on an app
  • p. 61
  • Considering support, for multiple languages
  • p. 61
  • How culture and locale can impact an app
  • p. 65
  • 3.3
  • Great usability experiences are intuitive
  • When is the app used?
  • p. 70
  • Consider the time of day
  • p. 70
  • Consider the day of the week
  • p. 72
  • Consider the time of year
  • p. 73
  • How long is the app used?
  • p. 74
  • p. 5
  • 3.4
  • What activities are being undertaken while using the app?
  • p. 78
  • Is the person using the app moving or stationary?
  • p. 78
  • Is the user dedicated or distracted?
  • p. 79
  • Is use isolated or in conjunction with something else?
  • p. 80
  • Are they-standing, sitting, or lying down?
  • 1.2
  • p. 81
  • 4
  • What device is the app running on?
  • p. 83
  • 4.1
  • Write once, run everywhere?
  • p. 84
  • 4.2
  • Supporting multiple operating systems
  • p. 86
  • Six components of great app experiences
  • OS-imposed restrictions
  • p. 86
  • Looking like you belong on the OS
  • p. 87
  • Belonging on a version of the OS
  • p. 89
  • Belonging in the enterprise
  • p. 89
  • 4.3
  • Maintaining brand identity and differentiation
  • p. 6
  • p. 90
  • Branding vs. visual identity
  • p. 91
  • Separating your brand from the OS
  • p. 91
  • Maintaining OS conventions while still reflecting a brand
  • p. 93
  • 4.4
  • Supporting different device capabilities
  • p. 93
  • Context of use underpins everything in an app
  • Handling multiple physical device sizes
  • p. 94
  • Variations in internal hardware capability
  • p. 97
  • Accounting for software variations
  • p. 100
  • Part 2
  • Input
  • p. 103
  • 5
  • p. 6
  • How people interact with the app
  • p. 105
  • 5.1
  • Supporting different pointing devices
  • p. 106
  • Providing input with a finger
  • p. 107
  • Providing input with a stylus
  • p. 112
  • Providing input with a mouse and the keyboard
  • Input includes all ways data and information get into the app
  • p. 114
  • 5.2
  • Using a pointing device to provide input
  • p. 116
  • Supporting gesture-based input
  • p. 116
  • Supporting multi-touch input
  • p. 119
  • 5.3
  • When pointing and touch input become difficult
  • p. 7
  • p. 121
  • Touch events don't always do what the user wants
  • p. 121
  • Raw input events need special attention
  • p. 123
  • 6
  • User-entered data
  • p. 126
  • 6.1
  • Goals of the people using the app
  • 1.1
  • Output includes and goes beyond what is shown onscreen
  • p. 127
  • Improve tasks by minimizing input
  • p. 128
  • Improve tasks with defaults and suggestions
  • p. 134
  • Improve tasks with alternative inputs
  • p. 136
  • 6.2
  • How to ask for data to be entered in forms
  • p. 138
  • p. 8
  • Optimizing how the form is arranged
  • p. 138
  • Simplify how text is entered
  • p. 143
  • Password entry requires special consideration
  • p. 146
  • Simplifying entry from a fixed set of options
  • p. 149
  • Validation and required fields
  • p. 151
  • Responsiveness: how output is perceived
  • 7
  • Data not from a user
  • p. 155
  • 7.1
  • Data from web-based resources
  • p. 156
  • Dealing with the data you directly request
  • p. 156
  • Dealing with data pushed to the app
  • p. 158
  • p. 8
  • 7.2
  • Getting data from the device
  • p. 161
  • Input from the operating system
  • p. 162
  • Data from, the filesystem
  • p. 163
  • Data from, other apps
  • p. 164
  • 7.3
  • Connectivity changes and isn't always guaranteed
  • Getting data from sensors
  • p. 166
  • Transparency and permission when using sensor data
  • p. 166
  • Allow for variations in sensor input
  • p. 168
  • 7.4
  • Using heuristics and inferring input
  • p. 171
  • Enhancing the app experience based on an individual's usage
  • p. 9
  • p. 171
  • Enhancing the app experience based on the usage of all people
  • p. 172
  • Part 3
  • Output
  • p. 175
  • 8
  • Displaying items in the app
  • p. 177
  • 8.1
  • Resources are finite and must be managed
  • Fundamentals of good visual output
  • p. 178
  • Focus on the person using the app and their goals
  • p. 178
  • Meet the expectations of the people using the app
  • p. 178
  • Account for the specific device being used
  • p. 179
  • Respect standards and conventions
  • p. 180
  • p. 10
  • 8.2
  • Laying out controls on a screen
  • p. 181
  • Implying meaning and relationships through alignment and hierarchy
  • p. 182
  • Implying meaning and relationships through consistency
  • p. 183
  • Implying meaning and relationships through proximity
  • p. 184
  • 8.3
  • 1.3
  • Navigating within the app
  • p. 186
  • Common navigation patterns
  • p. 186
  • Special navigation considerations
  • p. 188
  • 8.4
  • Avoiding discrimination with what you display
  • p. 191
  • Ensure your UI works for everybody
  • How considering all six components can make apps better
  • p. 191
  • Saying Ike same thing to everybody who uses the app
  • p. 192
  • 8.5
  • Many factors affect the display of images
  • p. 193
  • One size doesn't fit all
  • p. 193
  • Physical size isn't everything: consider formats and formatting too
  • p. 196
  • What's usability, and why does it matter?
  • p. 10
  • Customizing image placeholders
  • p. 198
  • 8.6
  • Use distinct icons with specific meanings
  • p. 200
  • 8.7
  • Allow for extremes of connectivity and content
  • p. 202
  • Content that loads slowly or doesn't load at all
  • p. 202
  • Example 1
  • When content isn't available
  • p. 203
  • Avoiding empty states
  • p. 203
  • 9
  • Non-visible output
  • p. 207
  • 9.1
  • Physical and audio output support changes onscreen
  • p. 208
  • An email client
  • Give your app a voice
  • p. 208
  • Haptic feedback starts with vibration
  • p. 210
  • 9.2
  • Output to other apps and devices
  • p. 212
  • 9.3
  • Communicating from your backend
  • p. 214
  • p. 11
  • Allowing for multichannel communication
  • p. 215
  • Sending effective push notifications
  • p. 216
  • Using badges with push notifications
  • p. 219
  • 9.4
  • Communication via channels beyond the app
  • p. 221
  • Using email to communicate with your users
  • Example 2
  • p. 221
  • Using SMS to communicate with your users
  • p. 223
  • Using third-party messaging services to communicate with your users
  • p. 223
  • Part 4
  • Responsiveness
  • p. 227
  • 10
  • Understanding the perception of time
  • A nexus app
  • p. 229
  • 10.1
  • How people perceive mobile time
  • p. 230
  • Context influences the perception of responsiveness
  • p. 230
  • Perception is about feelings, opinions, and comparisons
  • p. 231
  • Being responsive with notifications
  • p. 233
  • p. 13
  • Meet expectations, don't just be as fast as possible
  • p. 234
  • 10.2
  • Influencing the perception of responsiveness
  • p. 236
  • Answer questions about what the app is doing
  • p. 236
  • Show appropriate progress when something's happening
  • p. 240
  • Animation can hide delays
  • Example 3
  • p. 240
  • Usable isn't the same as finished
  • p. 241
  • 10.3
  • Perceptions associated with the age of your app
  • p. 243
  • 11
  • Making your app start fast
  • p. 248
  • 11.1
  • A tower defense game
  • Doing the minimum to start the app
  • p. 249
  • Deciding what to do on startup
  • p. 249
  • Displaying a splash screen when launching the app
  • p. 252
  • 11.2
  • Preloading content to make the app faster
  • p. 254
  • Preloading content to distribute with the app
  • p. 15
  • p. 254
  • Preloading content for the app's next use
  • p. 255
  • 11.3
  • Preformatting content retrieved by the app
  • p. 257
  • 11.4
  • Caching content to save time and money
  • p. 259
  • Using in-memory and disk-based caches
  • p. 1
  • 1.4
  • p. 260
  • Checking for new versions of cached items
  • p. 262
  • When to invalidate and delete cached items
  • p. 264
  • 12
  • Making your app run fast
  • p. 268
  • 12.1
  • Using eager loading so people don't have to wait
  • Why you need to consider the six components in your apps
  • p. 269
  • Eager loading complements preloading content
  • p. 270
  • Beware of being too eager
  • p. 272
  • Knowing what to load eagerly
  • p. 272
  • 12.2
  • Parallel operations take less time
  • p. 273
  • p. 17
  • Synchronous and asynchronous operations
  • p. 275
  • Advice when working in parallel
  • p. 276
  • 12.3
  • Combining requests for improved speed and control
  • p. 279
  • Controlling the server your app connects to
  • p. 279
  • Getting faster responses by combining requests
  • Experience is an important differentiator
  • p. 280
  • Simplifying the client by combining requests
  • p. 281
  • Combining requests and local files
  • p. 282
  • Part 5
  • Connectivity
  • p. 285
  • 13
  • Coping with varying network conditions
  • p. 17
  • p. 287
  • 13.1
  • Not all connections are the same
  • p. 288
  • Securing your connection
  • p. 288
  • Connection-speed can vary
  • p. 289
  • Connection cost can vary
  • p. 290
  • Meet the expectations of those who'll use your app
  • 13.2
  • Occasionally connected is the norm
  • p. 292
  • Connections may not be possible
  • p. 292
  • Connections may be lost
  • p. 294
  • Connections may change
  • p. 294
  • 13.3
  • p. 20
  • Optimizing for subprime conditions
  • p. 296
  • Caching improves the experience in subprime conditions
  • p. 296 --
  • Planning for success
  • p. 21
  • 2
  • Usability matters to everyone
  • Who's using the app?
  • p. 27
  • 2.1
  • You aren't your users
  • p. 28
  • How you're different from your users
  • p. 28
  • You're not an average user
  • p. 31
  • Be aware of the effects on your thinking
  • p. 2
  • p. 32
  • 2.2
  • Who's the app for?
  • p. 33
  • Who'll get value from your app?
  • p. 34
  • Understanding the potential user base
  • p. 35
  • Are there enough people who want the app?
  • p. 36
  • Usability, UX, and design
  • Targeting groups of individuals
  • p. 39
  • Putting on a persona, or several
  • p. 40
  • Enterprise app usage
  • p. 42
  • 2.3
  • People aren't all the same
  • p. 43
  • Consider people's differing abilities
  • p. 2
  • p. 44
  • Consider people's differing expectations
  • p. 45
  • Consider people's differing goals
  • p. 47
  • 2.4
  • What are people doing?
  • p. 49
  • What are people doing with the app?
  • p. 49
  • Formula for app success
  • What else are people doing?
  • p. 53
  • 3
  • Where and when is the app used?
  • p. 57
  • 3.1
  • Where is the app used?
  • p. 57
  • App usage at a macro-geographic level
  • p. 58
  • 13.4
  • Balancing usability and a poor connection
  • p. 299
  • Prioritizing important activities in poor conditions
  • p. 300
  • Adjusting network usage based on network conditions
  • p. 301
  • 13.5
  • Keeping the user in control when conditions are poor
  • p. 302
  • Compression improves the experience in subprime conditions
  • 14
  • Managing power and resources
  • p. 309
  • 14.1
  • When it's gone, it's gone
  • p. 310
  • 14.2
  • Do you really need it?
  • p. 313
  • Lazy loading reduces wasted effort
  • p. 296
  • p. 314
  • Using alternatives to save resources
  • p. 315
  • 14.3
  • How often are you going to use it?
  • p. 318
  • Managing resources that are only used once
  • p. 318
  • Managing resources that are used repeatedly
  • p. 319
  • Deferring actions increases what's possible in subprime conditions
  • 14.4
  • Do you still need it?
  • p. 320
  • Turning off resources when finished
  • p. 321
  • Responding to changing circumstances
  • p. 322
  • p. 297
  • Batch operations in subprime conditions
  • p. 297
  • Automatic retries improve the experience in subprime conditions
  • p. 298
Control code
1056626391
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (1 volume)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781617293931
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
Stock number
CL0500000997
System control number
  • (Sirsi) 1056626391
  • (OCoLC)1056626391

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